Community · Leadership Development

Sophomore Year Service Learning Reflection

For my Leadership Advancement Scholarship, I am required to receive 30 hours of community service. This year for my 30 hours I did a multiple of different activities and events.

One of my favorite service opportunities that I did was mentoring a 4th-grade girl. We met every Tuesday at 4 o’clock. We went to the local library, the discovery museum, bowling and even to one of the study rooms in my residential hall. I love being able to make a positive impact on her. Tuesdays are one of my favorite days of the week.

IMG_3810I also did a lot of mini volunteer projects with the RSO I am a part of called Rotaract. We made Valentine’s day cards for a nursing home, passed out encouraging cards to students around finals, pulled weeds at a local park and held a dodgeball tournament to raise money for future

service events. It was such an amazing experience working on the Eboard of such a generous club. We were continuously searching for our next volunteer opportunity. One of our future projects is building a bathroom for the Women’s Shelter in Mount Pleasant. We received a grant to help aid us, and we are going to help contractors finish the project soon!

I have learned so much this year through my service projects. I’ve learned how to come out of my shell when asking for donations, how to lead an individual project, and most importantly how I can improve other people’s lives.

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Leadership Development · Leadership Education

HDF 110 Reflection

If I could recommend any class to take a Central Michigan University, it would be Michele Lee’s HDF 110: Roots and Oppression.  This class not only taught me important information that was crucial to being inclusive, it also made me take a step back and evaluate myself. We learned topics such as racism, ageism, ableism, sexism, and topics on the LGBTQ community.

Professor Lee taught created a safe place in her classroom. Students were able to voice their opinions, contribute to dialogue and answer questions freely and openly. The classroom was filled with respect and openness. Professor Lee was super knowledgeable about all of her topics she taught. I learned so much in such a short semester.

This class should be required. In today’s day and age, people need to learn about topics that usually fly under the radar. The problems with racism and homophobia will not improve if they are not talked about.

I am so glad this course was required for me to keep my Leadership Advancement Scholarship. I feel much more educated on topics that are rarely discussed. This class helped me become a better and more inclusive leader.

Leadership Development · Leadership Education

PHL 118L

For my leadership advancement scholarship, I am required to take certain courses that will enhance my understand of leadership and people. One of those courses required my Sophomore year was Philosophy.

I have to admit I was very nervous when beginning this class. Philosophy was a completely foreign subject to me, I have never had a class on this subject. I went into the class with an open mind and tried my best to fully wrap my head around the topics we discussed.

My professor was Gary Fuller. He was a very wise and educated man. He attended Oxford University for graduate school. I always enjoy having a professor that is extremely knowledgeable on the subject they are teaching. I can learn so much from a person that has studied a certain field for years.

Gary was an incredible teacher. He knew so much about this topic and his lessons were taught with such passion. I learned so much from him, he taught me how to open my mind about certain topics, and he taught me how to see arguments from both sides.

At the end of the semester, Gary Fuller threw a Christmas party at his house. It was so cool going to one of my professors’ houses. He played the piano for us, and served us a bunch of pie! I will always remember my sophomore year philosophy class.

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Leadership Education

LDR 200L

For my Leadership Advancement Scholarship, we are required to complete courses that follow along with our protocol. One of the courses is LDR 200L, which is all about leadership theories.

One of my favorite things we learned during this course was how to facilitate. Facilitating means leading an activity or project and then reflecting on how the activity related to everyday life lessons. This class not only taught us how to facilitate, it also gave us resources on activities to facilitate.

This course required us to put together an initiative and put it on for the class. We also were in charge of an entire workshop that taught our peers’ different leadership theories.

This course is different than other college classes. It is very hands on, instead of just learning what something was we learned how to do it and then actually got to do it. I appreciated the way we were taught, and how much support we received from the TA’s. I am so lucky to have been able to take this course with my cohort. It allowed for open conversations, easy learning environment and of course a fun class period.

I learned more in this class than any other course I have taken so far. I learned how to teach, how to learn and more importantly how to lead.

Now that I have taken this course I will most definitely pursue a leadership minor. This class inspired me to follow my passion of leadership. I will take the skills that I learned from this course and use them in my RSO’s on campus and a variety of different ways back at home.

“If your actions inspire others to dream more, learn more, do more and become more, you are a leader” -John Quincy Adams

 

Leadership Education

Servant Leadership in LAS Protocol

The definition of servant leadership according to Robert K. Greenleaf,  is a philosophy and set of practices that enrich the lives of individuals, builds better organizations and ultimately creates a more just and caring world. “The servant-leader is servant first… It begins with the natural feeling that one wants to serve, to serve first.” -Robert K. Greenleaf.

Servant leadership appears in our LAS protocol in a variety of different ways.

17904363_1549749585067592_4082459832143546204_nThe first way it appears is the protocol of having to receive thirty or more service hours per year. This is servant leadership because it is volunteering to help someone or an organization in a positive way.  You can serve your community, organization, friends and companies.

For my thirty hours of community service, I performed a variety of different tasks.16602029_1472658919443326_2582136798976815645_o I volunteered at Relay for Life, volunteered in Flint, I made blankets for a women’s shelter, I helped organized donated books for the Philippines, I made valentines day cards for a nursing home, I made lunches for homeless children and I volunteered at Potter’s House. Servant Leadership is supposed to enrich the lives of others around you. I have continuously pushed myself to help others on and off campus. This LAS protocol helped me push myself even further. Servant Leadership, in my opinion, is about dedicating time to help others in a positive way. I observed my cohort around me volunteering in so many different ways, we made in impact on so many people. The protocol of having to get 30 hours of community service hours encourage everyone in LAS to perform servant leadership.

img_2089Anther one of my favorite protocols for LAS is the service trip to Detroit. We are required to travel to Detroit with the Leadership institute to perform a multitude of different tasks to help the city. On the last day, we traveled to CASS Social Services to volunteer. We were all separated into different groups, some were in the kitchen making food for the homeless, some helped make mats out of recycled tires etc. It was the perfect application of servant leadership because we all contributed to a cause that would affect the city of Detroit in a positive way.

The Servant Leadership theory portrays itself in so many different ways. Anyone can be a servant leader.  It takes time, dedication and passion for what you are doing. There are a multitude of different real life applications that are considered servant leadership. The Leadership Advancement Scholarship does a fantastic job encouraging their students to dedicate their time to a good cause. Receiving 30 hours of community service and the Detroit Trip are just a few ways that the LAS cohort show servant leadership. There are so many other ways that we as students use servant leadership in our everyday life without being directed by our protocol. Servant Leadership, in my opinion, is the most important leadership theory known today. Serving others without pay or reward shows an immense amount of character. I am so lucky to be a part of a scholarship that expects us to apply servant leadership to our everyday lives.

Community · Leadership Development

LEAD Team Reflection

For the Leadership Advancement Scholarship, we are required to participate in a LEAD team. This means your group up with other LAS grades and perform some kind of service project or activity. This was something I was most excited about coming into my freshman year. I was ready to work on a project with people who care about it, just as much as I do.

IMG_5977My LEAD team this year was Relay for Life. We were challenged to create a table at the annual Relay for Life event hosted at CMU each year. We had to raise as much money as we could to be able to contribute to Cancer research. I was very nervous about this team because I had never participated in Relay for Life before. I had been to a few walks, however, I did not understand how it all worked. It was really amazing to work with my fellow team members to raise money for such an amazing cause.

My roommate lost her grandma to cancer. I have seen how it has impacted her in so many ways. She was also a part of the Relay for Life team, for me I felt like I had a purpose. It was such a rewarding feeling, working with my best friend in a cause that she cared about so deeply.

I raised over one-hundred dollars for the cause and worked the event. Working the event was one of the most rewarding parts of this team. It was such a fun day. Everyone’s leadership abilities shined throughout the day. I was able to stop walkers to take a picture with our sign and get them to buy a t-shirt for a donation. I was fun to be abe to talk to different people and learn about their survivor stories. During the day we also had a “Pie the LI” event where the walkers could come and pie us for only two dollars. I was pied a couple of times. It was definitely worth it in the end.

IMG_5972I learned so much from this experience. I learned how to raise money, how to work with a team, what Relay for Life is, and I also learned a new passion of mine. I want to continue to work with this organization and raise money for this cause.

Now that I have experienced a LEAD team first hand I cannot wait to do it again. I will encourage my mentee to be excited about the LEAD teams, and I will hopefully be able to be a part of the Relay for Life team again in the future.

Leadership Education

HST 110L

For my Leadership Advancement Scholarship, we are required to take certain classes to fulfill our protocol. During the second semester of my freshman year, we were required to take HST 110L: American Experience. This class explored immigration in early America and how it influenced our country to be the way it is today.

41kK2H2t92L._SX348_BO1,204,203,200_During this class, we were required to purchase two books, Post-Ethnic America by David A. Hollinger, and Major Problems in American Immigration History by Mae M. Ngai, and Jon Gjerde. We were required to write two five-page paper61jKVbeDAhL._SX327_BO1,204,203,200_s, four exam papers and we required to do a group presentation on a famous immigrant. Each one of these assignments challenged my beliefs and understanding of immigration. It caused discussions which enabled students to learn more about our history as a country and those who immigrated to it. We learned stories of the first settlers all the way up to those immigrated to America due to the Irish Potatoe Famine. This class gave me a better understanding on why and how immigrants during the nineteenth and twentieth century immigrated to America.

Now that I have taken this course I want to learn more about my ancestors and how they came to America. Over Christmas break, my dad was able to participate in Ancestry.com. He found out where his ancestors are from, when they came here and how they got here. I was not very interested during Christmas break when my dad first received his information in the mail, However, now that I have learned more about immigration during that time I have been more interested in my dad’s results.

This class challenged my beliefs and made me want to understand more about immigration into America in the past and today.