Personal Life

Dear Highschool Athletes

You do not know how much you will miss the family, support, and love that come from being on a team. My first year of college has taught me so much, however, I know that the team atmosphere that my coaches have created allowed for me to be one step above everyone else. I learned so much from the short four years that I was on a team. Here is a list of things I want you to live by:
IMG_0103Drama is NOT worth the time: Every single person on your team matter. Do not leave people out, do not create cliques and DO NOT hurt your best friends on your team. The seniors and I from last year still text each other in our group message every single day. We miss each other so much and I know each and every one of us regret ever causing drama among us at some point in time. At the end of the day none of it matters, leave it behind and spend the quality time together that all of us wish we could still do.

Listen to Coach: I know it sucks admitting this to yourself, but your coach is (usually) ALWAYS right. They have been through so much, so whether they are coaching you on your stance or coaching you through a problem not even related to your sport, listen. I regret ever thinking that what I thought was more important than what coach thought. They have a plan; they wouldn’t keep coming back every year if he did not want to see your team succeed. Again, cut the attitude and listen to your Coach. Most of the time they truly know what they are talking about.

Take Practice seriously: I remember those hot days standing by the tee waiting for coach to stop looking so I could stop swinging for a second. Let me tell you, I REGRET IT. I wish I would’ve listened to my coaches and took every swing and every serve seriously. The satisfaction of having an amazing swing or serve is something I wish I could’ve sooner (or if at all) accomplished while in high school. You will never ever have the time again to just go for two hours and play the sport you love. Please please please do not take it for granted.

Do not sweat the small stuff: yeah your coach may be pissed at you on the bus ride home but please do not let that define your character. IMG_0634Buck up, and show up to practice with a good attitude. Work your butt off and prove to your coach that he does not have a reason to be mad anymore. I regret coming home at night after a bad game and dreading practice the next day, I wish I would’ve been madder at myself and allow it to make myself better instead of being mad at my coach for being mad at us.

Appreciate your parents: After a game when your parents are annoying you, telling you how much they love you, please appreciate it. I miss my parents every single day at school and I would do anything to be able to go back to a warm spring night and listen to them brag about how proud of me they are. Thank them for organizing your food for tournaments, thank them for coming to your games. They do not have to do it, but they do it for you!

Take advantage of off season workouts: when you get to college there is no one pushing you to work out. I only wish I could have had a coach setting up different work out regimens for me at school. It’s unbelievable how much those workouts and open gyms help you. I regret not appreciating them enough. Now that I am super out of shape even though I am working out it makes me realize that every single rep or lap helped make me a better athlete. Please attend as many as you can, you are only bettering yourself!

Every year is a new year: It does not matter if you were starting captain of the JV team lIMG_0143ast year. Every year is a new year. EVERY single year you need to push yourself to be an even better athlete than the year before. Show up to every practice, every open gym and every day of tryouts with the best attitude possible. Work as hard as you have possibly worked. Prove to the coaches that you are the best version of yourself that you can be. Trust me, hard work does eventually pay off, even if it does not feel like it all the time. Let the hard work you put into your athletics rub off on your other activities, whether that be your grades, clubs or home life. Everything you do needs to be 110 percent. Do not have any regrets when you walk across the stage your graduating year.

Appreciate the underclassmen: They are the next you! Raise them like you would’ve wanted to be raised. Let the freshman or sophomores know you are there for them, and remind them that they are worthy of being on the team. We get to influence the incoming athletes; we get to practice with them and teach them things that players before, taught you. It is important to play that role both on the field and off the field. Do not influence them to party or do negative things. Be a positive role model.

IMG_0104Do not ruin what you have for a party: This one is so important. Your reputation is so very crucial in the athletic world, however also the adult world. I promise you, that party is not worth it. I promise you, you can say no! Just be smart, you are a role model, and a representation of the Fowlerville Softball team.

In the end, I miss softball, volleyball and high school immensely. I do have to say though I have few regrets when it comes to my softball and volleyball careers. If you listen to my advice listed above I believe you will have few regrets as well. The athletic programs you have been so blessed to be a part of is one of a kind. Take advantage of all the opportunities these programs and school have to offer you. Make your future seasons the best ones yet. Even if that season isn’t a winning one, you will still gain more than you lost from it. Being a part of a team is something you will remember forever. Do not allow for yourself to let it slip away. Good luck this season!

Love,

Riley McGuire #22

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Leadership Development · Personal Life

Freshman Year Review

I hear many students around campus talking about “how fast this school year went”. fullsizeoutput_e66I nod my head and think about how in just a short week I will be done with my first ever year of college. It went by so incredibly fast, it feels like yesterday I moved in.

Then I sit and reflect on everything that happened in such a short year and realize how much I actually went through to get where I am today. I switched my major three times, finished 35 credits, joined two organizations, accepted an eBoard position, interned at a church, switched rooms, took multiple exams, met my two best friends and found my passion all in two semesters.

IMG_1107 I battled depression and anxiety all while learning ways to cope with life away from home. I discovered what works for me when I am upset, and I have learned how not to get upset. I found myself. I learned that I was a different person than I was just a short nine months ago. I am stronger, more passionate and overall a more open minded person.

College changed me. Some ways good, some ways bad. I am a better listener, I care about people and their beliefs. I know what I want in my future and I have found friends that will stick by me. I have learned to take naps anywhere, and I have gained the confidence to go to class before even getting ready. I have also learned that the stress of college WILL make you gain weight no matter how much you work out and eat healthily. College will make you fatter no matter how much you try for it not to. IMG_0633

Something that I realized pretty early on, is how much I value my friendships at home. The people that I surrounded myself with at home, are people that I still love and cherish just as much as my new friends. I appreciate them so much. They listened to me cry, came and visited me and reminded me that home isn’t so far away when you stay in touch with the people that matter. IMG_2239My friends from home are my rocks. They have supported me in everything I have done and I cannot thank them enough.

All in all, this year in total sparked many emotions. I now appreciate my parents and family so much more. I live every day in the moment and I have met the two most amazing women that I know will be forever friends. I value life and family and friendships.

IMG_1871I also learned that college sucks. It is a phrase that every college student has mumbled at least once under their breath. College sucks, but it is also the most amazing thing at the same time. It is different, it is challenging but it is also rewarding. The late nights studying almost ruined me, the early mornings were not my favorite, the cafeteria food could have been better, some people I met were strange, not all of my professors knew my name and there are no adults around to rescue you. It is the transitional period from adolescence to a real live adult.

BUT I MADE IT. I really did. I received mostly A’s and am still on track to graduate! WOW, who would have thought? Life could not get any better than it is right now. I appreciate everything my parents, friends, and advisors did to get me where I am today. I look back to just 5 months ago where I was considering dropping out and all these people helped make sure that I made it. I owe everything to them.

This year is one I will NEVER forget. I have found who I truly want to be. I cannot wait for the three amazing years and endless opportunities ahead of me. fullsizeoutput_e6a

 

 

Community

Mentor Reflection

200c7786f2457944ee83b90562ba03daAs a new freshman, life on campus can be hectic. I remember the feeling of not knowing anyone as I walked around campus. I remember not knowing where I was on campus. It is a terrible thing. The one thing that allowed for me to transition into college as well as I did was my mentor.

As an incoming freshman in the Leadership Advancement Scholarship, you are paired up with a sophomore mentor. I was blessed to have an amazing mentor my freshman year. I learned so much from her, and I cannot wait to be able to mentor someone next year and give them the same knowledge that I received.

To prepare us to be a mentor, our LDR 200 class participated in a Mentor Workshop. I had ideas of what I needed to do, however, after the workshop, I had a better idea of what being a mentor entailed. I am prepared to listen to my mentee, and I am prepared to dedicate time to them all year.

I am looking forward to having a mentee so that I can teach them things going into college that I wish I would’ve known. It is such a scary process, and going into it alone can make it worse. I am looking forward to teaching them, however, also learning from them. Being a mentor is such an amazing way to learn about yourself. I will be such a great example for my mentee, and I will push myself even further to be the best student and role model I can be.

I am preparing myself to be a mentor in a variety of different ways. Not only am I taking pictures of my current dorm room now to share with my mentee but I am already thinking about important facts and tips that I can share with them. I am also preparing myself by talking about how I am going to treat my mentee with others. I want the people around me to hold me accountable. I want to be the best mentor and role model possible.

Now that I have gone through the mentor workshop I have discovered things that I need to work on. Before next year I want to stay in touch with my mentee and provide support throughout the summer. I also will introduce him/her to other mentors that can provide them help as well. I cannot wait to give someone the gift that I received last year. The gift of friendship, love, and guidance.

Community · Leadership Development

LEAD Team Reflection

For the Leadership Advancement Scholarship, we are required to participate in a LEAD team. This means your group up with other LAS grades and perform some kind of service project or activity. This was something I was most excited about coming into my freshman year. I was ready to work on a project with people who care about it, just as much as I do.

IMG_5977My LEAD team this year was Relay for Life. We were challenged to create a table at the annual Relay for Life event hosted at CMU each year. We had to raise as much money as we could to be able to contribute to Cancer research. I was very nervous about this team because I had never participated in Relay for Life before. I had been to a few walks, however, I did not understand how it all worked. It was really amazing to work with my fellow team members to raise money for such an amazing cause.

My roommate lost her grandma to cancer. I have seen how it has impacted her in so many ways. She was also a part of the Relay for Life team, for me I felt like I had a purpose. It was such a rewarding feeling, working with my best friend in a cause that she cared about so deeply.

I raised over one-hundred dollars for the cause and worked the event. Working the event was one of the most rewarding parts of this team. It was such a fun day. Everyone’s leadership abilities shined throughout the day. I was able to stop walkers to take a picture with our sign and get them to buy a t-shirt for a donation. I was fun to be abe to talk to different people and learn about their survivor stories. During the day we also had a “Pie the LI” event where the walkers could come and pie us for only two dollars. I was pied a couple of times. It was definitely worth it in the end.

IMG_5972I learned so much from this experience. I learned how to raise money, how to work with a team, what Relay for Life is, and I also learned a new passion of mine. I want to continue to work with this organization and raise money for this cause.

Now that I have experienced a LEAD team first hand I cannot wait to do it again. I will encourage my mentee to be excited about the LEAD teams, and I will hopefully be able to be a part of the Relay for Life team again in the future.